Avoiding Hemorrhoids – Advice for Truck Drivers

Look up causes of Hemorrhoids and the term sedentary occupation will invariably be among the list, and probably high on the list. So it comes as no revelation that the Health Insurance Axis, a company that seems to cater to the insurance needs of Truck Drivers, lists hemorrhoids among the key ailments for that occupation. While not your typical office environment, the cab of most large trucks leaves little room to maneuver. Plus, the side to side motions, and the bumps and castling from uneven road surfaces, puts pressure to the anal area increasing the potential for hemorrhoids to develop.

Such a high incident of the disease among Professional Truck Drivers begs the answer to a number of questions. How and why are they impacted with a high rate of hemorrhoids? Is avoiding and preventing the hemorrhoids possible? If not, what might be a sound, treatment?

How and Why Impacted

Look at almost any list of causes of hemorrhoids and you will see “sedentary occupations” which are normally associated with office work. But, consider that a truck driver’s office is the cab of his vehicle, where he is always assuming a sitting position. That coupled with the fact that the job demands that truckers be very schedule conscious which leaves little opportunity to follow healthy bathroom habits and a good exercise routine.

Is Avoiding Hemorrhoids Possible

In my last article on this subject, I referenced a medical opinion, that when it comes to hemorrhoids or piles, “an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure”. So what can a truck driver do to avoid and thereby prevent this problem? According to Joy Seeman’s, Staff  Writer for the Hemorrhoids Information Center, article “Truck Drivers and Hemorrhoids” drinking water daily will help prevent hemorrhoids.

Another website, “ExpertHealthAdvice.com” concurs with the suggestion to drink more water. In addition, they add a diet that is richer in high fiber foods, such as more bran, fruit, vegetables, and whole grains. And, conversely, they suggest avoiding refined or processed foods, because they do not pass through the colon easily, and can result in the need to strain during bowel movements.

One additional thing a truck driver should consider is to change their bowel habit. In other words, don’t wait until the urge is strong. This, according to ExpertHealthAdvice.com, gives the stool time to harden, resulting the need to strain during the bowel movement.

A Sound Treatment Plan

The Hemorrhoid Information Center states that hemorrhoids is one of the three most researched health conditions on the internet. This has lead to an avalanche of products and professed treatments being peddled on the world wide web. For this reason, most of the writing on this condition strongly suggest getting an exam from your Physician. Why? Simply to rule out other possible problems, such as rectal cancer, and a condition known as “annal fissures” which is a tear in the lining of the anus or anal canal.

Another suggestion was for the patient to get an exam called a sigmoidoscopy which permits the doctor to exam half the colon for abnormalities.

Personally, I hope that is not the case. Any trucker that has to endure a sigmoidoscope exam will think someone is trying to drive his 18 wheeler up his backside. Other than that, the exam is a good idea.

If the exam reveals that one is only dealing with a mild case, perhaps the suggestion from the “WEBMd” will suffice. Their suggestion is “Most hemorrhoids can be treated with simple changes in diet and bowel habits. Most do not require surgery or other treatment unless they are very large and painful. If that is the case, do what your doctor suggest.

Conclusion

While they may not think it to be so, Professional Truck Drivers, have a sedentary job. A job that restricts movement or walking, and unlike the typical office environment, one that results in the body being shaken and tossed about during the road trip. This combined effect, increases the potential for developing hemorrhoids.

While there are things the truck driver can do to prevent them, if they do occur, the first step should be to see a doctor for an exam. If the hemorrhoids are not serious, a change in diet, including more water daily and an exercise routine, while not easy for a trucker, is the suggested treatment. For more serious cases, follow your Doctor’s advice.

Warren Robinson

Source by Warren C Robinson

Leave a Reply